What is the best way to control diabetes?

Diabetes is a chronic condition that occurs when your body can’t make or use insulin. It leads to high blood sugar levels, which are dangerous if not controlled properly. Diabetes affects about 29 million Americans, making it the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States.
The best way to control diabetes is by maintaining a healthy weight, eating right, exercising regularly, and taking medications as prescribed by your doctor.

The best way to control diabetes is by maintaining a healthy weight, eating right, exercising regularly, and taking medications as prescribed by your doctor. Click To Tweet
Diabetes is a chronic condition that occurs when your body can’t make or use insulin. It leads to high blood sugar levels, which are dangerous if not controlled properly. There are two types of diabetes: insulin-dependent (Type 1) and non-insulin-dependent (Type 2).

Type 2 diabetes is the more common form of diabetes, affecting about 25 million Americans. It’s marked by elevated blood glucose levels that are not controlled by the patient’s diet or exercise.

Insulin-dependent (Type 1) diabetes is marked by your body’s inability to produce enough insulin to keep your blood sugar level under control. About 5 percent of all children and youth who have diabetes were born with the condition. There’s no cure for Type 1 diabetes, but it can be controlled by medications that help block insulin resistance.
Diabetes takes root when your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to regulate your blood sugar levels. The majority of type 2 diabetics are overweight, which puts them at greater risk for the disease. Obesity is also linked to type 2 diabetes, but it can occur in people who are not overweight.
Also, having a parent or sibling with the disease increases your risk of developing diabetes.
Triggers for Diabetes Type 2 diabetes can’t be prevented, but having prediabetes or type 2 diabetes may be associated with adverse outcomes in pregnancy. Prediabetes occurs when blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is often found in people who are overweight or have a family history of the disease. Once someone is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, they are at higher risk of developing complications.
Overweight people are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if they eat too much or don’t exercise enough. Lack of exercise has been linked to increased blood sugar levels, but it’s still not clear exactly how this happens. Some research suggests that your body doesn’t use insulin efficiently, so it releases even more insulin in response to the food you eat.
It’s important to understand that type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease. The longer you live with it, the more likely you are to develop complications such as heart disease, eye problems, and nerve damage.
Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which your body destroys its own insulin-producing cells. This type of diabetes usually develops in children and young adults; other family members may also be affected by it.
Triggering Complications
If left untreated, diabetes can lead to many complications. A serious condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) occurs if your body can’t make enough insulin to control your blood sugar level. It develops when fat builds up in your liver, preventing it from reaching your muscles and other organs. Without insulin to help convert food into energy, you’ll have excess glucose building up in your bloodstream instead. This buildup triggers a breakdown of fat, which produces toxic acids called ketones.
DKA is a medical emergency that can lead to coma and death. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, confusion, and unusual fatigue or sleepiness.
When to Seek Medical Attention For type 2 diabetes, you should check your blood glucose levels regularly and discuss them with your doctor on a regular basis. If you have a family history of the disease, you should get tested often. It takes an average of ten years to develop type 2 diabetes, so if you haven’t been diagnosed for a while, it’s possible that your blood sugar levels haven’t risen. You may want to get tested more frequently if you have any physical symptoms of the disease, such as swelling in your hands and feet.
If left untreated, diabetes can lead to many complications. A serious condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) occurs if your body can’t make enough insulin to control your blood sugar level. Type 1 diabetes usually develops in children and young adults; other family members may also be affected by it.
Symptoms Include: Abdominal Pain
Fatigue
Confusion
Unexplained weight loss, which may be more than 10% of your body weight. The first step in controlling diabetes is to evaluate how well you are doing each day. A good first step is to check your blood sugar levels regularly and discuss them with your doctor on a regular basis. It’s also a good idea to learn as much as you can from other people who have been diagnosed with the disease or have been living with it for a long time.

It takes an average of ten years to develop type 2 diabetes, so if you haven’t been diagnosed for a while, it’s possible that your blood sugar levels haven’t risen. You may want to get tested more frequently if you have any physical symptoms of the disease, such as swelling in your hands and feet.

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